The plot thickens

It’s day two of Camp NaNoWriMo and I’m behind in my word count – way behind.  The upside is I’m still working on my novel, just indirectly.  Even though my word count is not progressing much at the moment, I’m working to get to where the words will flow.  I decided (belatedly I know) to deconstruct the first half of the novel.  I’ve started editing the first part of it but realized I haven’t read the last two-thirds or so since I wrote it last November.  Not only that, but I’ve learned some things recently about scenes and blocking out plots.

I’m not so worried about my low word count this early in the month.  The average daily word count to shoot for to finish on time is 1,613.  It’s not an assignment; it’s a number to keep in mind.  Another number the folks at The Office of Letters and Light (the NaNo organizers and managers) supply on their novel stats page is the average words you would have to write from where you are now to still finish on time.  For me in the middle of day two with 246 words under my belt it’s 1,651.  See?  It’s still early.

Getting back to scenes and plot progression.  When I read a book I have to be able to visualize the action and the scene or enough of the scene my imagination can fill in the blanks.  What that translates into is scenes.  If I don’t have enough information to visualize a scene it pulls me out of the story.  If I find myself wondering what the author meant by something, wondering if I missed something, it pulls me out of the story.  I’ve been hearing a lot lately about thinking of a novel as a series of scenes.  I’d never thought about it that way, but it eventually became a light bulb moment.

It had to percolate in my subconscious for a while, but I think the brew is ready.  I opened the first half of the novel and I’m taking it chapter by chapter making review margin comments that look like this:

Chapter 1 – Scene:  Protag introduces herself. / Scene:  Protag explains how the story starts and how she had a fight with her BFF.

Chapter 2 – Scene:  Protag is freaked out because __________. / Scene:  Protag calls BFF and tries to explain, asking her to come over.

Chapter 3 – Scene:  BFF is convinced the fight was a mistake and sees proof.  Protag’s mother invites BFF to stay for dinner. / Scene:  Protag convinces parents she is sick and should stay home from school.  Protag makes a plan with BFF who is going to play hooky.

Keep in mind there’s a lot going on in each chapter to capture and hold the attention of the reader but the list of scenes is a good way to distill the story down to its bones.  My hope is that eventually I will be able to make a scene-by-scene outline that will allow the actual story writing to progress faster.

I read author’s sites when I enjoy their writing.  At one such site (I can’t remember which one) the author recommended you take a novel you like, that has a plot you appreciate, and deconstruct it.  I wasn’t sure how to go about that, but the scene list looks like a good way to go.  I think I’m going to start with the first of the Sookie Stackhouse novels by Charlaine Harris, Dead Until Dark.  I love that book, and I want to figure out how the heck she did that, never mind best seller’s lists and HBO deals.  I’ll let you know how it pans out.

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